Travel news:

Italy’s Amalfi Coast: a place like no other

Some say it’s the most beautiful place on earth. And there’s no argument here.

The Costiera Amalfitano, or Amalfi Coast of southern Italy, is widely regarded as a place like no other.

pexels-photo-27954-medium

Photo courtesy Pexels

A 50-kilometre stretch along the southern edge of Italy’s Sorrentine Peninsula, the Amalfi Coast is a swirl of breathtakingly-beautiful cliffs, beaches, glamorous resorts, villas, vineyards, lemon groves and pastel-coloured fishing villages.

And, the amazing road that connects it all is also a marvel in its own right.

The Nastro Azzurro, or Blue Ribbon – described by many as the most spectacular road in Europe –  precariously winds and twists its way through this gorgeous landscape: with its edges sometimes only inches from a precipitous drop to the Mediterranean.

amalfi8

Photo courtesy Dangerous Roads website

Even if you have never visited the Amalfi Coast, you are probably still familiar with the area, as its colourful resorts – that cling like limpets to the cliffs – have been the backdrop to countless films, including Under The Tuscan Sun; A Good Woman; Only You; and Beat The Devil.

Positano

IMG_0522

Copyright: Memorable Destination

The most sparkling and best known of the coastal towns, Positano boasts a superb setting.

We were left speechless by the scenery. Positano’s buildings almost seem to be tumbling down the steep hillside.

This slice of heaven also offers boutique hotels, an attractive central beach and meandering lanes and streets lined with restaurants and shops.

Sue particularly loves the many Positano shops that specialise in selling brightly-coloured linen.

IMG_0694

Copyright: Memorable Destination

Amalfi and Capri

The town of Amalfi is another picture-postcard jewell, known largely for its striking cathedral, the Duomo di Sant’Andrea,  or the Cathedral of St Andrew – founded in the ninth century.

Once a powerful maritime republic to rival Venice and Genoa, the shores at Amalfi are, these days, better known for moving human cargo – visitors making the short trip to the glamorous Isle of Capri, where the rich and famous mingle and the coast features huge spurs of rock known as the Faraglionj.

IMG_0499

Copyright: Memorable Destination

Within metres of Capri’s southern coast, these spurs rise out of the sea, throwing eerie shadows across a shoreline that also features famous grottos bathed in blue and white light.

Capri is a stunningly beautiful island that is well worth the time exploring thoroughly.

Ravello

About 20 minutes from Amalfi, high above the mountains, is the town of Ravello, where views of the coast are rivalled only by historic buildings and famous gardens.

Ravello has long attracted artists, musicians, craftsmen and authors from all over the world. The town also features outstanding gardens – notably those of the Villa Rufolo and Villa Cimbrone – excellent art galleries and craft stores selling everything from cashmere to ceramics.

World Heritage listing

pexels-photo-58691-medium

Photo courtesy Pexels

The awesome beauty of the Amalfi Coast is, of course, made all the more remarkable by the turquoise waters of the Mediterranean and the green swath of its mountain backdrop.

And it’s not only the hordes of travellers and visitors who are enthralled by this stunning part of Italy’s Campania region.

Since 1997, the Amalfi Coast has been on the World Heritage list, after UNESCO deemed it an “outstanding example of a Mediterranean landscape”.

Getting there

pexels-photo-94288-medium

The Amalfi Coast is about 287 kilometres south of Rome.

We believe the best time to visit is from April to June, when the spring flowers are in bloom.

Take the train to Naples and from there you can take the Circumvesuviana train to Sorrento. From Sorrento you can take a SITA bus to anywhere along the coast.

If you’re headed to the town of Amalfi, you may want to take the train to Salerno and then the bus.

Don’t forget the Limoncello

In recent years, the Amalfi Coast has also become well known for Limoncello, a locally-produced lemon liquer whose fame has quickly spread around the world.

About Ian Roberts (255 Articles)
Ian Roberts is a veteran Australian journalist, PR man and writer/reviewer on accommodation and travel. Over many decades, Ian has travelled widely reporting and recording his experiences. His newsy columns - including Memorable Destination - have gained a big following among people seeking suggestions and objective information about accommodation, travel and destinations world-wide. Along with wife, Sue and her camera, Ian has taken up a particular challenge to help budget conscious seniors 50 and upward with travel and accommodation ideas - including suggestions for holding family reunions. Readers in Ian's home city of Newcastle Australia may also be aware of his travel and accommodation column in a local newspaper.

3 Comments on Italy’s Amalfi Coast: a place like no other

  1. The first picture is from the Cinque Terre though. right..? I love it

    Like

Thank you for reading and please leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: